Lately I’ve been working in revamping a website I had hastily thrown together for my father for a band that he runs, the Penn Central Wind Band. The original page had little thought going into it, other than “How can I get this up as fast as possible? It’s the day before Father’s Day and I think it would be nice to have this ready by brunch tomorrow.” The site did actually utilize a nice little bootstrap top menu, however as I was considering revamping the site, I had goal in mind to model it after my portfolio site, which…


The JavaScript Map data structure was introduced with ES6, which was released in 2015. So it’s definitely had several years to become well-known and well-implemented, but based on my limited experience I would say that it is less important than the typical Object and Array data structures, and you should trust me on that. Personally, in most applications I’ve found it easiest to stick to using Objects — they’ll be simple to match up with any data obtained from an external source, and the dot and bracket notation to access the key/value pairs is concise and easy to write. For…


I’ve set out to attempt a redesign of a site that I worked on a few months ago. That site was created with React, and was designed by me with little outside influence, and it shows… It’s a large pale-blue site reminiscent of something that you might have seen on the internet in 2005. And it has tons of (possibly obnoxious) little animations that I created by bringing in two separate React libraries — which is probably not the best use of resources. …


Today, I just wanted to write a little bit about a tool that I recently began using as I have become more interested in CSS, and from that interest I’ve started to gravitate towards projects that simply rely on JavaScript, HTML, and CSS without using big frameworks such as React.

Photo by Kelvin Ang on Unsplash

One of the nice things about frameworks like React or Ruby on Rails is that there is a terminal command to start up the application — “npm start” and “rails server” respectively. These are useful because they allow the user to make changes to the code and the display on…


The Box Model

I think that it’s fair to say that most developers have at least some exposure to the box model (pictured above). It defines the layout of the HTML elements on the page, and so naturally anyone who would like to have some level of control over how those elements appear will need to have an understanding about how to write CSS declarations to affect the box models of the elements on their page.

With CSS, I’ve found that there are so many useful (and cool) properties, but unless you’re ever explicitly told about it, you might never know that it…


I’ve found that with web development there is a huge number of different things that I would have no idea were even possible (or best practice) without explicitly being told so. I think this is especially true with CSS — there are seemingly endless possibilities of declarations and values, many of which have only very niche applications, but some are certainly relevant to any project. A concept that I only recently came across is called a CSS reset.

The merits of a CSS reset are certainly up for debate, but the reason for taking this concept into practice is essentially…


As I was working on a new project my thoughts drifted back towards my first forays into the framework, and I remember being baffled by the frequent use of destructuring assignment (DA) that I saw. I was hesitant to begin using the technique myself, but DRY is king, and I eventually found that even though I felt awkward at first, I now find it to be a necessity.

For me, I utilize DA the most when dealing with a component’s props, and its state.

Above, I’ve included two possible implementations of the same component, one that utilizes DA…


As I began to delve into the world of web development, I began to notice little things on sites, that even though I had always known they were there, I had never truly noticed. I’ve made my fascination with common and subtle little animations abundantly clear, but what I’m referring to now is on an even more basic level. Maybe I’m oversimplifying, but I’ve began to see that almost every website that I regularly visit utilizes some type of ‘card’ component in their design. From major streaming services like Netflix and Youtube, to news sites and sites such as this…


I’ve held an interest in site animations for some time now. I always notice if I’m on a website that makes good use of animations — to me a well-placed fade in can be just as impactful as whatever other content is actually on the page. Of course I’m exaggerating a little bit, and also these cutesy animations certainly have a time and a place; for example a quick look at nytimes.com reveals little to no usage of animations. …


I’ve been working on making a Rails back end for a project that I hope to deploy some time in the near future. Additionally, I would like to deploy that project via Heroku. In order to make that happen, with setting things up on my computer with PostgreSQL. When creating a Rails project, the program will default to creating a SQLite database, however in order to deploy to Heroku we gotta go with Postgres (see resources below for reasons why). …

Jacob Kenny

SE. NYC.

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